Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Starting off the reading year...


One of my goals for the new year is a recurrent one: to read more.  It's always easier over the holidays because there's more time to lay around and read while I'm eating and drinking too much.  Plus, people know that when all else fails,  they can always buy me a book from my Amazon wish list.  I've always got a few goodies lying around to get to on the first of the year.  Hoping this jump start signals a start to a year with more reading, less time wasting.

This year, my first book down was Delancey by Molly Wizenberg.  I love Molly Wizenberg, in a much too familiar way that includes following her on Instagram and feeling like I have an actual reason to know that she is currently on vacation in Mexico with her husband.  I particularly enjoy hearing her laugh on the podcast she hosts with fellow food writer Matthew Amster Burton, but more on that later.  I enjoyed Delancey, as I'm pretty sure I would enjoy most things Wizenberg would ever write.  She is funny, and clear and honest, and doesn't have a lot of BS or arrogance.  I liked hearing about the process of conceptualizing and opening a restaurant, and she is open about the difficulties that even a successful venture can bring to one's life, marriage and livelihood.  I felt a little something missing from this one, and am still trying to nail it down. I thought it was the lack of distance, time wise, from these events, and thus perspective.  But I think there's a little more to it than that.    

The story of Delancey is her husband's story, probably because Delancey the restaurant was and continues to be his passion, and not necessarily Molly's.  She is upfront about that in the book, and tries to wrestle with what that means for her, for him, and for the two of them together.  However, it still feels like an unresolved, and perhaps somewhat unexplored issue.  That status probably makes for a better marriage than it does a satisfying read.  But still and all, it's exactly the kind of book I like to read: a story laced with recipes, exploring the world of food, and people that love it.  Since it's not written by a cocky bad ass chef with something to prove, I liked it all the more.  I've cooked a few of the recipes from the book: they are not recipes from items on the restaurant's menu, but rather food that Molly and Brandon cooked at home while they were in the process of planning and opening the restaurant.  Simple, come together easily kind of things, which is great for me.  At first glance, these seem like things that don't even need recipes, like throw in the leftovers fried rice.  But I'll be glad to return to her description of the technique of these dishes, and I really enjoyed the sweet-hot roasted pork as an alternative to some of the other braises I like to make during the winter.  Overall, a winner of a book.

I'm also trying to use downtime to listen to audio books. Say, when I'm folding laundry and L. is watching SlugTerra at top volume on the iPad two feet away from me.  Who's to say I can't have my ear buds in then, right?  If he needs a granola bar, he's going to let me know, ear buds or not.
Using this logic, I'm currently halfway through Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng.  As with many audio books, and let's face it, many regular books, this one started slow for me.  If it's not a fast paced page turner, I just have a harder time wading into books these days.  Once I get into a book, I have a hard time doing anything else but read it.  I love the more literary reads, just need a way to dive in over my head a little faster.

As I said, I'm only a little more than halfway through this book, but it's had me thinking more than any book I've read in a good long while.   It's a book that got a lot of attention on the "best of" lists at the end of 2014.  I was surprised, because I actually received this book free as an audio book as part of a promotion on Good Reads, and often I don't think giveaway books end up garnering a lot of critical acclaim.
It's a heartbreaking book in many ways, I guess any book that begins "Lydia was dead.  They didn't know it yet" is bound to be sad.  But it isn't just the death and loss of Lydia that is getting to me about this book.  Instead, it is the fact that there is so much miscommunication and inability to listen to each other in the family at the center of it.  Everything I Never Told You, indeed.  For James, the husband and father, everything is filtered through his experience as a Chinese American boy, alone and hurt by racism, and determined that life for his children will be different.  For Marilyn, it's about not following through with her dream to one day be a doctor, and terror that she will turn out like her mother, a disapproving and sad presence, who left nothing behind after her death aside from a few lines highlighted in a Betty Crocker cookbook.

It's a book about defining yourself based on the expectations of someone else, whether you decide to accept them or rebel against them completely.  Ng shifts the perspective in this book from character to character, and back and forth throughout time.  Each time I saw how differently each person was experiencing each event, I wanted to yell "Just talk to each other!"  But of course, we often don't, do we?  We live our lives so much in our own heads, certain our understanding of ourselves and others is correct, and if we do have doubts, afraid to ask in case our worst fears might indeed be confirmed.  How many of our memories, when we bring them out to light with others, are shown to be so different than the recollections of others, trapped up in their own biased filters?

So, I keep wanting to stop listening to this book, but keep getting pulled back in.  The writing is beautiful, even to listen to, so I imagine would be even more so on the page.  Lots of images that seem fresh but yet so exactly right: a near impossible feat.  I can only hope to find a few more treasures of reading experiences like this one throughout the year.


1 comment:

Megan -- booksandcarbs said...

I think your review of Delancey is right on, except that I haven't tried any of the recipes so can't attest to their quality and ease! Another glimpse into Wizenberg's life and word is always wonderful, but there is something missing in comparison to A Homemade Life.

I too received Ng's novel as part of the giveaway, but I've been avoiding it. I'm sure it is wonderful, but it takes a lot to gear up for a heartbreaking read.

I hope more of these posts are forthcoming as I love your book reviews!